The EEOC updated its Q&As on COVID-19 and the pandemic in light of the ADA and Rehabilitation Act. The highlights are as follows:

  • Employers may:
    • Require accurate and reliable COVID-19 tests in order to decide who may return to work when employees will be physically entering the workplace.
    • Ask employees who will be physically

Governor DeWine signed an executive order on June 16, 2020 that provides exceptions to the general rule that employees may not refuse to return to the workplace following a COVID-19 pandemic layoff or work-at-home situation. Employees with “good cause” may remain at home and refuse to work and still receive unemployment benefits. Good cause includes:

As employers transition to return to work and return to in-office work, there will be employees who will be fearful of a return to work due to the risk of contracting COVID-19 in the workplace. How do employers handle those requests?

The employee fears contracting COVID-19 but has no underlying special risk factors

For those

I previously reported on the Governor’s Responsible Restart Ohio plan to phase-in a re-opening of businesses that were closed or affected by COVID-19. Originally, the plan required masks or face coverings for employees, customers, guests, and others. That requirement was eliminated one day later. Yesterday, on April 29, 2020, it was added back in for

The EEOC released additional guidance on the types of questions employers can ask about symptoms and diagnosis and handling COVID-19-related information. This information is important for those “essential” businesses continuing to operate and keep their employees safe.

What can employers ask when an employee calls in sick?

Employers may ask if the employee has symptoms

UPDATED 3/16/20: The Department of Labor issued new guidance for employers handling issues related to the coronavirus (COVID-19).

OSHA/Safety

OSHA has information available to employers related to infection prevention and safety, available here.  Notably, that guidance includes much of the information we are already aware of about “social distancing” (keeping approximately 6 feet

With the global spread of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19), employers are scrambling to plan for the possible implications on the workplace. There is no one-size-fits-all approach. Below are nine considerations for employers, for which each employer must determine what best fits its workforce and business. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has interim guidance for